Work for Yourself – The Knowledge Worker

Work and Business in the 21st Century is changing dramatically before our eyes.

Corporate downsizing, product and information savvy customers, online business,
project work,consulting, the speed of technology,declining industries and new
emerging industries are some of the factors influencing and shaping the workforce
of today.

The media love to portray only doom and gloom – why?

Because millions of people globally are gripped by fear- fear they will lose their
employment, fear of change, fear of being lost in a sea of emerging technologies and
fear that the world they once knew no longer exists.

Whilst this is going on, others are quietly embracing the change, opening up their
minds to the endless opportunities of the new world of work and learning everything
they can about new technology and communication platforms.

Enter the world of the Knowledge Worker……..

Have you ever heard of the term ‘Knowledge Worker’?

A knowledge worker is one whose job depends on what they
know. They may have advanced ‘know-how’ that others need.

As we make the transition from the Industrial Age to the Information Age
at lightning speed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that knowledge and
expertise is an asset which can be packaged and sold
as ‘consulting fees’ or charged out as hourly rates or project work.

Knowledge workers can use their prior work experience, skills and knowledge
to offer services to organisations, increasingly via remote work locations
made possible by good internet connections and the latest communication
technologies.

A knowledge worker knows how to work in a particular way that is creative,
outcomes focused, strategic, analytical and independent.

These types of ‘project workers’ are an increasingly valuable resource for
organisations which struggle to support the salary costs of full time employees.

Although it’s very necessary to feel connected to other workers and be part
of a team it is equally important that the knowledge worker is able to
operate autnomously, and often, as a ‘business within a business’.

Each knowledge worker needs to identify their expertise, and work on
themselves as a project. This includes lifelong learning to upskill, using
social media platforms such as Linked In to connect with other professionals
and networking to ensure that opportunities are capitalised on.

A knowledge worker also needs to develop a certain level of self-confidence,
resilience and a willingness to market themselves to organisations, bid for projects
and self-promote to create consistency in work flow and income.

Completion of the checklist below you indicate if you have the ideal mindset to
become a knowledge worker:

  • Initiative
  • Personal drive
  • Stamina
  • Confidence to network and market yourself
  • Focus
  • Outcomes driven
  • Persistence
  • Commitment to goals
  • Visionary (see the big picture)
  • Self- Awareness
  • Positive ‘can do’ mindset
  • Adaptable to take up new opportunities
  • Capable of action
  • Decisive
  • Ambitious
  • Willing to embrace technology
  • Willing to share ideas
  • Willing to assist others
  • Mindful of being a good corporate citizen
  • Aware of local community
  • Aware of economic conditions
  • Ability to think outside the square
  • Existing level of business acumen
  • Good negotiation skills
  • Good communication skills

New and emerging websites such as those listed below are indicators of how work is
changing from full time employee to self-employed project worker based on existing
knowledge, skills and experience:

Take some time to research what is happeining online- you will be pleasantly
surprised!

www.freelancer.com (Sydney based)
www.elance.com
www.vworker.com
www.guru.com